17Nov

The Trouble with Having a Smart Dog

It’s great having a smart dog when you’re training her to do what you want her to do. It’s not so great when she’s getting into trouble all on her own.

Rocky’s latest trick? I walked into the kitchen and found the cupboard under the sink wide open, the kitchen trash can lying on the floor, and a trail of garbage, including coffee grounds, leading through the kitchen and out the dog door, through the garage, the next dog door, and into the dog yard. Sabrina had eaten meat that evening, so I thought maybe it was a one-time thing. But about three days later, Rocky did it again, this time with a near-empty trash can, the only thing of interest being the plastic wrap from my marinated tofu.

kitchen-trash-72I found her right after the act the second time, and scolded her soundly; she looked heartily guilty, and I would like to think that alone will keep her from doing it again. But, we can’t take the risk that she might get into something dangerous in the garbage. So, for now, we have the kitchen cupboard below the sink latched shut with a small dog collar to keep her out. A royal pain for us, because it means we have to unclasp the buckle every time we want to throw something away – but, better safe than sorry. (And we won’t even talk about the uncooked chicken thigh she stole out of the pan on the kitchen counter a few weeks ago a couple of hours before our dinner guests arrived. At least we still had enough left for the rest of the dinner.)

Now, the good thing is this shows Rocky is able to open doors. That could be put to positive use in future training. It’s all a question of appropriate time and place, and making sure she is safe.

Here’s another example of smart (and useful) behavior: When a door is closed but not latched, the other two dogs won’t generally push it open. We have a laundry room, and when I go in there, the door usually swings shut, without clicking all the way closed. Rocky likes to keep tabs on me. If I am in the laundry room for more than a minute or two, she shows up on the other side of the door, and nudges the door open with her nose and enters the room. This is actually great service dog behavior. She is keeping track of me, knows my whereabouts. If by chance something were to happen to me, she would know where I was, and how to get to me. She could potentially lead someone to me if I were incapacitated in any way. So this is something to be encouraged.

If you remember, when she first came to live with us, she was an escape artist. She was leaping over our lower rock walls  in the front yard and on our patio, and going under the dog yard fence. We had to put up a higher fence, and also had to install an electric fence line at the base of the dog yard. That stopped all escape attempts. Ideally, however, we would like her to be able to have access to a door and not run away, because she might need to open a door for someone – say, emergency personnel.

Today, I accidentally tested that. I was out on the patio, talking on the phone to my uncle. Usually when I go back in, Rocky is very quick to re-enter with me. Because I was distracted by the content of our conversation, when I went back inside, I failed to notice that Rocky was still on the patio. I went to the living room, and talked with Sabrina for fifteen to twenty minutes about the phone call, then got up to go to the kitchen. As I did, I looked toward the glass door – and saw Rocky sitting there, with the most pathetic expression on her face, waiting to be let back in. I went outside and apologized profusely, and brought her in. Only at that time did I realize – she did not try to escape. She didn’t jump the rock wall, didn’t attempt to gain access in another way. She remained right where I left her, and waited for me to come back. It is a testament to the bond we have been forming, and the training we have both been undertaking.

Good dog, Rocky. But no more unapproved kitchen snacks, OK?

 

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  1. So much fun to hear about how you and Rocky are beginning to bond. Thanks for sharing I wait for more.

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